Michael Sappol: How to Be Modern with Scientific Illustration: Fritz Kahn, Popular Medicine and the Visual Rhetoric of Modernity, 1916-1960

Mar 29, 2012, 12:00 am

This is a poster with a naked man, a heart, cells, a microscope and wordind on the bottom all in German.
Fritz Kahn
Credit: Das Leben des Menschen, Vol. 4 (Kosmos/Franckh’sche Verlagshandlung: Stuttgart, 1926). Artist unknown. Courtesy National Library of Medicine.

Fritz Kahn (1888-1968), a German-Jewish physician and popular science writer, was one of the first proponents of modernist scientific illustrations, which were conceptual, metaphorical and self-consciously modern in their aesthetics. Historian Michael Sappol situates Kahn’s illustrations and larger agenda within Weimar cultural politics, analyzes key images and genres and discusses the global diffusion of modernist conceptual scientific illustration. Sappol is a curator and historian at the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Presented by the BFA Fine Arts Department.


Thursday, March 29, 6:30pm


133/141 West 21 Street, Room 101C


Free and open to the public


Free and open to the public