Graphic Novels to Read as Quarantine Continues
May 19, 2020
The cover of seven graphic novels made by SVA alumni. From top left: Steven Universe: The Tale of Steven written by Rebecca Sugar, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness adapted by Peter Kuper, Stoker & Wells: Order of the Golden Dawn illustrated by Barry Orkin, The Marvel Art of Joe Quesada by Joe Quesada, Pug Davis written by Rebecca Sugar, Promethee 13:13 illustrated by Shawn Martinbrough, Batman: Creature of the Night illustrated by John Paul Leon.

During the COVID-19 quarantine, we’ve offered a multitude of things to read, watch and do to keep the SVA community inspired, occupied, safe, sane and creative. We’ve proposed tips on working or learning from home, delivered artistic responses to the coronavirus, ideas on where to safely social distance outside, advice for staying emotionally healthy, recommendations for movies and TV shows to watch, cookbooks to try out, books to read to your children, and more (all of it is accessible here).

 

As self-isolation continues, so do our recommendations. Below is the latest—a roundup of recent graphic novels, cartoons and comics by SVA alumni and faculty. Happy reading, and stay safe and healthy!

A comic book cover featuring a stylized drawing of Batman.
Credit: DC Comics

Batman: Creature of the Night is a standalone story set outside the regular continuity of the Batman comic, about a boy named Bruce Wainwright after the death of his parents.

Written by Kurt Busiek; illustrated by John Paul Leon (BFA 1994 Illustration)

DC Comics

Hardcover/e-book, $24.99/$16.99

A book cover featuring drawings of a man's face giving an intense stare and a riverboat.
Credit: W.W. Norton & Company

Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness is a graphic-novel adaptation of Conrad's novella about a voyage up the Congo River and the horrors of colonialism in Africa.

Adapted by Peter Kuper (faculty, BFA Cartooning)

W.W. Norton & Company

Hardcover, $21.95

A book cover featuring a color illustration of several Marvel superheroes.
Credit: Marvel Universe

The Marvel Art of Joe Quesada follows the illustrious career of Joe Quesada (BFA 1984 Illustration), EVP creative director, Marvel Entertainment, from his start as a comics illustrator. It features some of his best interior and cover art, as well as previously unpublished images and sketches.

Joe Quesada

Marvel Universe

Hardcover, $50

A book cover featuring an illustration of an astronaut floating in space above a glowing celestial object.
Credit: Comixology Originals

Promethee 13:13 is a limited-series prequel to Cristophe Bec's best-selling science fiction series Promethee.

Written by Andy Diggle; illustrated by Shawn Martinbrough (BFA 1993 Illustration)

Comixology Originals

E-book series, $2.99 per issue

A book cover featuring a color cartoon illustration of a person and a pug dog, with the person making a "bunny ears" gesture behind the pug.
Credit: Albatross Funnybooks

Pug Davis is an early comic work by Steven Universe creator Rebecca Sugar (BFA 2009 Animation) about an astronaut with the head of a pug named Pug Davis, and his adventure with his partner, Blouse.

Rebecca Davis

Albatross Funnybooks

Paperback, $13

A book cover featuring a color illustration of the popular cartoon series character Steven Universe.
Credit: Abrams Books

Steven Universe: The Tale of Steven is the official picture book adaptation of "Change Your Mind," an hourlong special episode of Cartoon Network's Steven Universe.

Written by Rebecca Sugar; illustrated by Elle Michalka and Angie Wang

Abrams Books

Hardcover/e-book, $14.99/$10.79

A book cover featuring a color illustration of two men in the foreground with a monochrome illustration of a menacing-looking face in the background.
Credit: Our Gal Pictures

Stoker & Wells: Order of the Golden Dawn is a graphic novel that combines real people and literary creations to create a new story full of adventure and exploration.

Written by Steven Peros; illustrated by Barry Orkin (BFA 1989 Illustration)

Our Gal Pictures

Paperback/e-book, $19.99/$12.99


This feature is an adaptation of an article in the spring/summer 2020 edition of the Visual Arts Journal.